More home buyers are now willing to file cases against builders in NCDRC


NEW DELHI | MUMBAI: Lawyer Sahil Sethi has got over 25 calls since Tuesday morning from home buyers wanting to file cases against builders in the National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission. They too want an order like the one Sethi got in a case he filed against builder Jaypee for delaying its Kalypso Court project in Noida

The commission asked Jaypee to pay 12% interest for the delay and to complete the project by July 21, failing which it will have to pay Rs 5,000 per day per home as a penalty till it hands over homes to the buyers.

In another order, the commission asked Mumbai-based builder Lodha group to refund Rs 1.02 crore to a buyer with 18% interest. On May 6, the court directed Parsvnath Developers to refund the entire amount paid by around 70 home buyers in its Parsvnath Exotica project in Ghazi ..

NCPBA is now registered


NCPBNCPBA is now registered and board objective will be –
1. To get the speedy delivery of NCP
2. To get compensation for Delay of project
3. To get Maintenance agreement for 2 years
NCPBA has already decided to go legal against NEL and we request all other members who are not registered to be part of NCPBA and provide the below mentioned documents to make our case more stronger –
1. Sale Agreement with NEL for their individual flat
2. Construction Agreement with NEL for their individual flat
3. Payment statement ( payment made to NEL, whether through bank loan or personally) 
NEL has already made lot of irregularities even in the Registered sale deed of the flat owners who have registered their flats.Hence , we request all flat owner to come forward and give strength to fight this injustice.We already have few members who have provided all the above documents to us , so we  request other members as well to join hands together and fight against NEL.
NCPBA Committee 

Banks Can Come After Your Assets If The Builder Defaults


reduce-the-tax-on-property-rentalLet’s say you’ve taken a loan for a house on the 10th floor of a building, under construction. Let’s say you’ve gone for the 80:20 scheme, where you’ve paid 20% and the builder says he’ll pay the EMI on the 80% until construction is complete. Let’s say that the builder runs out of money – maybe because interest rates are too high, maybe because he couldn’t sell the remaining flats, or maybe because of the Realty Ponzi scheme.

Either ways, he throws up his hands and says he can’t finish the property. Six months pass, and there’s no sign of any action. The bank now says you have to pay the EMI on the 80%. What happens now?

Many people believe the bank should take over the property and recover the money, and your EMI is no longer applicable. This is a gross misunderstanding.

You are fully responsible for the loan repayment.

Remember, the builder has taken his money. The bank has given it. The loan was given to you, not the builder, against your earning capacity and the collateral of the property.

When the builder was paying the EMI, the bank didn’t care – it had given you a loan, but the builder was paying interest.

When the builder stops paying interest, it will ask you to pay instead.

If you decide not to pay, the bank will attempt to sell the property. It is unlikely that people want to pay full price for a stalled project, and there will be a shortfall (auction amount could be less than the total loan). You have to now make up the difference, immediately, including all interest accrued in this sale/waiting period.

If you do not, you will be labelled a defaulter under CIBIL. (You might already be notified before the bank attempts to sell). This affects your ability to get a loan in the future.

And then, the bank can go after your other assets under the SARFAESI act. This includes all possessions you own like a car, another property or such. Further if the loan is taken jointly in the name of your wife or parents, their properties too are at stake. Personal/Home Loans in India are “full recourse” , where the bank or financial institution has full recourse to your other assets in case of a default.

The only thing a court cannot attach (to pay back such a loan) is your Provident Fund (PF) account. (I may not be legally up to date on this, though)

This applies to 80:20 loans (where the full amount has already been disbursed) and to regular home loans (where only partial disbursement has happened). This also applies to loans where you have been paying the EMI – you are still responsible for the rest of the loan.

Your options are to “settle”, hoping that the bank doesn’t want to go through the long legal process. The other option is to stall through the legal process, hoping that this will just go away, considering the extreme delays in our legal system. (This will still impact your CIBIL score) Since technically the builder defaulted to you, you have to take legal action against him for any further recovery.

(In one such case, a builder in Kolkata defaulted on a 176 cr. loan, and the bank is likely to take over the project and sell the flats. The case is still evolving.)

What this means is: Do not assume your responsibility ends if the builder defaults and bank takes over the house. You have a liability to pay anyway, your other assets can be attached and you will get a hit on your CIBIL score.

Read Original Article – Click Here

Real Estate Bill- How it will help home-buyers


The much awaited Real Estate Bill, which aims to protect the interests of buyers and bring more transparency to the sector was on Thursday passed in Rajya Sabha.The bill was first introduced in 2013 and amendments have been made to it by the present government.

 The Finance Ministry in 2012 paper on black money had pointed out that the real estate sector is vulnerable to black money because of under-reporting of transactions.
Here are some important features of the bill:

Better organised real-estate sector

The real-estate sector in India is unorganised which leads to various discrepancies in the functioning. The bill will establish state-level authorities called Real Estate Regulatory Authorities (RERAs) which will regulate transactions related to both residential and commercial projects. The authority will grade the projects helping customers to make better decisions.

Timely completion and hand-over

One of the problems which buyers face is that they don’t get possession of property as promised by the seller because of delayed construction among other issues. The bill ensures that 70 per cent of the money taken from buyers has to be kept aside in a separate bank account and this money can only be used for construction activities. This will ensure that the sellers don’t invest the money received from one project into another project.

Accurate information

As per the bill, it will become mandatory for sellers to disclose all information like project layout, approval, land status, contractors, schedule and completion of project with customers as well as the RERA.

Appropriate punishment

If the developer fails to hand-over the property to the buyer on time, then he would be liable to pay same amount as interest which he is charging from the buyer on delay in payment. Also, the property cannot be sold on the basis of ‘super area’ which includes both flat area and common area. If the developer violates the orders of appellate tribunal, then he/she can get a jail term of up to three years or penalty.

Allottees association and after-sales service

It has been made mandatory to set-up an allottees association within three months of the allotment of major units/properties so that the residents can manage common facilities like a library and a common hall. Also, if the buyer finds any structural deficiency in the property, then he/she can contact the developer for after-sales service within one year of possession. The promoters or developers cannot make any changes to the plan without consent of the buyer, the bill states.

– See more at: http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-news-india/real-estate-bill-to-be-tabled-in-rajya-sabha-today-heres-how-it-will-help-home-buyers/#sthash.StFFFPud.dpuf

Magic Bricks Now – Questions by Mr.Vishwanath – Nitesh Caesars Palace


Lawyers suggestion key points:
  1. Buyers association either registered or unregistered can represent the case. However, registration would give more benefits so  the builder is forced to talk to one identify who represents buyers benefit. Builder will naturally respond / negotiate once an association is formed.
  2. Registration can be done before Occupancy Certificate (OC)  but need to get the sale deed clearly checked line by line, by lawyer on this channel showed his suspicion of only 2 blocks ready out of 8 blocks: chances of many issues. Registration agreement needs clear scanning by lawyer to avoid future mistakes as the project isn’t complete.Buyer can register the property but do not tie registration to OC as that will clear all the uncertainty of owning the flat.
  3. Possession without OC is at builders cost. Builder is liable to bear all cost such as taxes, power, maintenance etc. Buyer can take possession if builder is giving alternate power but should be at his cost not owners.
  4. Maintenance agreement: There is no legal binding to sign any maintenance agreement during registration you can deny as it is one sided. Strictly No to maintenance agreement of 10 yrs..Builder cannot enforce this for signing. Demanding 1 year maintenance cost in advance is ok. Maintenance payments to be in the name of different or specific bank account. Need not pay more than 1 year.
  5. Arbitration clause is not applicable for filing case in consumer court. There is only consumer court for this issue and can be through association and effective through association rather individual. Interim relief for completion of amenities/services can be claimed at consumer forum.

Breach of promises: Home buyers take legal route against builder frauds, delays


lawHome buyers are becoming emboldened to take on the might of real estate developers as they see courts, state governments, as well as the centre with its proposed real estate regulatory Bill taking a strict view on cases of cheating, fraud and delays in delivery against builders.

Hiroo Advani, senior partner at law firm Advani & Co, expects more consumers now coming forward and filing complaints against developers.

“Home-buyers have realised that civil remedies are not good enough and criminal proceedings are turning out to be more effective. This seems to be the only way left to ensure that developers deliver on their promises. With this, developers would have to take up personal and not just professional responsibility hereon,” he said.

“Everybody needs to pull up their socks. Today, you can’t take consumers for granted,”