Advantages of filing case against builder as an association


Home Buyers are increasingly engaging builder on various issues related to projects. Builders also find it difficult to silence individuals when confronted as groups. Although social media and informal groups are good for raising collective voice, buyers should look forward to registering their associations.
Home buyers associations can file cases on behalf of its members at various forums including Consumer forums. Cumulative value of cases when filed by association can easily exceed one crore and case can directly be filed in NCDRC. A legally recognised and registered association gives an impression of seriousness of people involved. A legally recognised group can present the grievances of home buyers group at various forums.
It is also worthwhile to mention that various defamation cases are being filed by builders against individuals. A registered association can always stand up against such tactics by builders and back those who are targeted by builders.
To sum it up, it is very advantageous to form a legally registered association to file a case cumulatively against a builder.

PROMISES BROKEN, HOME DREAMS SHATTERED BY BENGALURU BUILDERS


Residents of Nitesh Forest Hills, an apartment complex owned by luxury estate brand Nitesh estates have gone to the consumer court over the issue of unfulfilled promises. The residents association is now hoping to make it a collective protest in order to truly make their ‘dream’ come true.

 

 

More home buyers are now willing to file cases against builders in NCDRC


NEW DELHI | MUMBAI: Lawyer Sahil Sethi has got over 25 calls since Tuesday morning from home buyers wanting to file cases against builders in the National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission. They too want an order like the one Sethi got in a case he filed against builder Jaypee for delaying its Kalypso Court project in Noida

The commission asked Jaypee to pay 12% interest for the delay and to complete the project by July 21, failing which it will have to pay Rs 5,000 per day per home as a penalty till it hands over homes to the buyers.

In another order, the commission asked Mumbai-based builder Lodha group to refund Rs 1.02 crore to a buyer with 18% interest. On May 6, the court directed Parsvnath Developers to refund the entire amount paid by around 70 home buyers in its Parsvnath Exotica project in Ghazi ..

NCPBA is now registered


NCPBNCPBA is now registered and board objective will be –
1. To get the speedy delivery of NCP
2. To get compensation for Delay of project
3. To get Maintenance agreement for 2 years
NCPBA has already decided to go legal against NEL and we request all other members who are not registered to be part of NCPBA and provide the below mentioned documents to make our case more stronger –
1. Sale Agreement with NEL for their individual flat
2. Construction Agreement with NEL for their individual flat
3. Payment statement ( payment made to NEL, whether through bank loan or personally) 
NEL has already made lot of irregularities even in the Registered sale deed of the flat owners who have registered their flats.Hence , we request all flat owner to come forward and give strength to fight this injustice.We already have few members who have provided all the above documents to us , so we  request other members as well to join hands together and fight against NEL.
NCPBA Committee 

Banks Can Come After Your Assets If The Builder Defaults


reduce-the-tax-on-property-rentalLet’s say you’ve taken a loan for a house on the 10th floor of a building, under construction. Let’s say you’ve gone for the 80:20 scheme, where you’ve paid 20% and the builder says he’ll pay the EMI on the 80% until construction is complete. Let’s say that the builder runs out of money – maybe because interest rates are too high, maybe because he couldn’t sell the remaining flats, or maybe because of the Realty Ponzi scheme.

Either ways, he throws up his hands and says he can’t finish the property. Six months pass, and there’s no sign of any action. The bank now says you have to pay the EMI on the 80%. What happens now?

Many people believe the bank should take over the property and recover the money, and your EMI is no longer applicable. This is a gross misunderstanding.

You are fully responsible for the loan repayment.

Remember, the builder has taken his money. The bank has given it. The loan was given to you, not the builder, against your earning capacity and the collateral of the property.

When the builder was paying the EMI, the bank didn’t care – it had given you a loan, but the builder was paying interest.

When the builder stops paying interest, it will ask you to pay instead.

If you decide not to pay, the bank will attempt to sell the property. It is unlikely that people want to pay full price for a stalled project, and there will be a shortfall (auction amount could be less than the total loan). You have to now make up the difference, immediately, including all interest accrued in this sale/waiting period.

If you do not, you will be labelled a defaulter under CIBIL. (You might already be notified before the bank attempts to sell). This affects your ability to get a loan in the future.

And then, the bank can go after your other assets under the SARFAESI act. This includes all possessions you own like a car, another property or such. Further if the loan is taken jointly in the name of your wife or parents, their properties too are at stake. Personal/Home Loans in India are “full recourse” , where the bank or financial institution has full recourse to your other assets in case of a default.

The only thing a court cannot attach (to pay back such a loan) is your Provident Fund (PF) account. (I may not be legally up to date on this, though)

This applies to 80:20 loans (where the full amount has already been disbursed) and to regular home loans (where only partial disbursement has happened). This also applies to loans where you have been paying the EMI – you are still responsible for the rest of the loan.

Your options are to “settle”, hoping that the bank doesn’t want to go through the long legal process. The other option is to stall through the legal process, hoping that this will just go away, considering the extreme delays in our legal system. (This will still impact your CIBIL score) Since technically the builder defaulted to you, you have to take legal action against him for any further recovery.

(In one such case, a builder in Kolkata defaulted on a 176 cr. loan, and the bank is likely to take over the project and sell the flats. The case is still evolving.)

What this means is: Do not assume your responsibility ends if the builder defaults and bank takes over the house. You have a liability to pay anyway, your other assets can be attached and you will get a hit on your CIBIL score.

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